Our everyday consciousness is often ineffective at creating the personal change we seek. This is because our conscious mind arises out of deeper layers of self where habitual self-organization exists and persists. Most often, as we struggle to change, we mentally become well aware of the problem and yet our attempts at solutions are unsuccessful. 

 

Inner mindfulness is an important resource that we can develop to get the results we want. This form of attention has been proven in meditative disciplines for millennia. For 40 years, the Hakomi method has been a pioneer at bringing mindfulness into psychotherapy. In the last 20 years, the benefits and value of mindfulness have been well documented through research.  As we develop our inner mindfulness, we establish a new platform of awareness with which we can more effectively explore our inner experience at deeper levels of self.

 

Initially, this allows us to get a better sense and feel for the issues in our lives. It further supports us in accessing the foundations of our self-organization, the "common thread" that runs through many areas of our lives like a pattern. As the unconscious automatic control factors are gradually raised to consciousness, they become re-organized by an ever-expanding "self-guidance." Ultimately, the path of mindfulness leads to forces of self-healing and inner wisdom.